Saturday, November 24, 2018

San Tan Mountain Regional Park

  Agent 54 here again.  My buddy Howard and I enjoy hiking in the San Tan Mountain Regional Park of Arizona, USA.  I' very thankful that my left knee has healed so well that I can make these hikes again.  I put in a lot of hours of doing therapy exercises to be able to do this.


Standing at the top of the Goldmine Trail on Goldmine Mountain in the park. 


This was way up there.


You can see 4 Peaks and the Superstition Mountains, looking past the valley, through the haze. 


Looking the other way towards Phoenix.  Too much haze to really see the city.


Looking across the valley to the highest peaks of the San Tan Mountain.


We tracked back down to the San Tan and Moonlight Trails to circle the valley.


Looking back at the Goldmine Trail from across the valley.


A southside hill.   Checkout the park at this site:  San Tan Mountain Regional Park


This photo is from the park website.


We hiked the Malpais Trail from the Rock Peak Wash trailhead today (12/1/2018).   This is the Rock Peak from the parking lot.


Rock Peak from the wash.


Clouds came out a little thicker making Rock Peak and two other peaks look a little ominous.


The Malpais Hills


The Malpais Hills have huge shear cliffs.


Looking East at Rock Peak and Malpais Hills from the valley on the Malpais Trail.  We had a rare cool and clouding day in Arizona.  Perfect for hiking.


There was a lot of rain in October and the desert is very green right now.


Agent 54 found a great natural lookout point in front of the shear cliffs of the Malpais Hills.


Howard at our Malpais Trail lunch spot.  Don't let the hat fool you, Agent 54 was not turned into a block of stone.


At a crossroads and heading home.


Howard said we hiked 7.6 miles in 4 hours today.  Time flew by.  It was a terrific day.


Howard and I did another hike of the San Tan Trail on 12/28/18.  It was a cool but, sunny day.


How old is this Petroglyph?


You can see the very steep side of Picacho Peak in the far hazy distance.


Looking back across a Saguaro forest valley, you can see Camelback Mtn. in the distance.